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Probity and Health in the context of a medical appraisal

This blog looks to explain the terms of probity and health in the context of an medical appraisal.

Probity:

The GMC requirements are expressed as follows: “Probity is at the heart of medical professionalism. Probity means being honest and trustworthy and acting with integrity. Probity is covered in paragraphs 65-80 of Good Medical Practice.” (GMC, 2012b, p3)

The AoMRC, 2014, recommend that: “The doctor should provide a statement indicating compliance with the requirements on probity set out in Good Medical Practice (GMC, 2013). This may take various forms depending on the appraisal portfolio that the doctor is using, but it should be clear that the doctor has considered all elements of the probity requirements of the GMC’s guidelines before making the statement.

On occasion, there may be ongoing investigations or disciplinary matters where progress towards resolution should be reviewed at appraisal. Appraisal is not the place where these matters should be resolved, but they should be acknowledged in a probity declaration”.

As well as signing the probity statement, and acknowledging where there is an ongoing investigation or disciplinary matter, the RCGP recommend that you reflect on the potential probity challenges raised in Good Medical Practice with your appraiser. This may include whether you have adequate and appropriate indemnity cover across the full scope of your work, any possible conflicts of interest between roles, business interests, etc.

Health:

The GMC requirements are laid out in Good Medical Practice: “Protect patients and colleagues from any risk posed by your health”. Paragraphs 28-30 (GMC, 2013)

The AoMRC, 2014, recommend that: “A declaration that the doctor has considered and complied with these requirements should be viewed and agreed by the appraiser”.

As well as signing the health statement, the RCGP recommends that you should reflect on your responsibility to be appropriately immunised, registered with a GP outside your own family and to protect patients from any risks posed by your health. If you have a health condition that could impact on patient care, it is best practice to reflect on any reasonable adjustments that you may have made to ensure that patient safety is not compromised.

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