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What should i include in my Personal Development Plan (PDP) for a doctor appraisal?

This Blog explains what you should and should not include in your Personal Development Plan (PDP) for a  doctor appraisal.

From: RCGP-Revalidation-Mythbusters-2016.pdf

The GMC requires you to agree a new PDP each year that reflects your needs as defined by the portfolio of supporting information and the appraisal discussion. This is a matter for agreement between you and your appraiser. There is no GMC requirement about how many PDP goals are appropriate, or about whether the goals are clinical or non-clinical.

There is nothing that the GMC requires your PDP to include – your goals should derive from your appraisal as an individual and your specific needs. The GMC requires you to make progress with your PDP each year (or explain why that has not been possible) and reach agreement with your appraiser on a PDP for the coming year that arises from your appraisal portfolio and the appraisal discussion. Your PDP should be Personal, Developmental and a Plan for the future that meets your needs in the context within which you work. The RCGP recommends that you develop SMART (Specific, Measureable, Achievable, Relevant and Timely) goals with your appraiser. Performance objectives should be part of job planning and not necessarily part of your appraisal and revalidation PDP unless you wish to include them. It often helps to work out how you can demonstrate that a change you plan as one of your PDP goals has made a difference by considering what the impact on patients will be.

The only PDP goals that are inappropriate are ones that are flippant, not specific to you, or irrelevant to your needs. Your appraiser will have been trained to help you work out how to write your PDP in such a way that it is a professional record of your personal development planning appropriate to your needs. The PDP goals should be balanced across the five-year cycle and across your whole scope of work. It is rarely appropriate to include non-specific goals in your PDP that could apply to any doctor and do not apply to your personal needs, or that are part of what you are required to do anyway e.g. ‘I need to keep up-to-date’. Such goals should be re-framed and described in more specific terms such that you can demonstrate where they have arisen, why they apply to you now, how you will achieve them, and how you will demonstrate that your goal has been met and that achieving the goal will make a difference.

Some doctors like to record lots of PDP items – it is your PDP. Most doctors find three or four are sufficient to capture their top priority goals. You might have one very big objective that you have broken down into separate interim or smaller goals.

From: RCGP-Revalidation-Mythbusters-2016.pdf

For further information and support on doctor appraisals, please visit: http://medicalapprais.wpengine.com

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