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How can doctors revalidate and continue to practice?

This Blog explains how doctors can revalidate and how the revalidation process works for licensed doctors.

From: http://www.gmc-uk.org/doctors/revalidation/9612.asp & http://www.gmc uk.org/Revalidation___FAQs_for_retired_doctors.pdf

There are three possible ways, depending on your specific circumstances.

  If you have a legally prescribed connection to a designated body, your revalidation will be based on a recommendation to us from your responsible officer.

Most doctors have a connection to a designated body which helps them with their annual appraisal (this could be your employer, faculty or another organisation). Designated bodies are responsible for nominating or appointing a responsible officer.

If you are unsure of your prescribed connection, you can use our designated body tool to check. Go to www.gmc-uk.org/dbtool.

Your responsible officer is usually the medical director of your designated body. Their revalidation recommendation to the GMC is based on your annual appraisals and other information drawn from the organisation’s clinical governance systems.

  If you don’t have a responsible officer, you may be able to find a suitable person to make a revalidation recommendation to us about your fitness to practise.

You can read more about the procedures for identifying and approving suitable persons on our website.Go to www.gmc-uk.org/suitableIf you don’t have a responsible officer or a suitable person to make a revalidation recommendation about you, and want to keep your licence to practise, you’ll need to give us information each year about your fitness to practise and continuous engagement in revalidation. You’ll also need to undertake an independent assessment of your medical knowledge and skills if we request it.

You can read more about the process for revalidation for those without a connection to a responsible officer or suitable person on our website. Go to www.gmc-uk.org/suitable_none.

The revalidation process:

  • Doctors need to have a regular appraisal based on our core guidance for the medical profession, Good medical practice. Our appraisal framework tells doctors, plus their appraisers and responsible officers, the professional values they need to show they are meeting in their everyday practice. Doctors in training will be assessed through the Annual Review of Competence Progression (ARCP) process they go through instead. Find out more information about how trainees will revalidate.

 

  • Doctors need to maintain a portfolio of supporting information drawn from their practice which demonstrates how they are continuing to meet the principles and values set out in Good medical practice. Doctors will need to collect some of this information themselves while the rest will need to come from the organisation that is supporting them with revalidation. Our supporting information guidance tells doctors the six types of information they need to collect, including Continuing Professional Development (CPD) and feedback from patients.

 

  • A person called a ‘responsible officer’ makes a recommendation to us, usually every five years, that the doctor is up to date and fit to practise, and should be revalidated. The responsible officer will usually be the medical director of the doctor’s designated body. They will make their recommendation based on the doctor’s appraisals over the last five years and other information drawn from their organisation’s clinical governance systems.

 

  • We will receive a recommendation about a doctor from their responsible officer and we will carry out a series of checks to ensure there are no other concerns about that doctor. If there aren’t any such concerns, we will revalidate the doctor. This will mean that the doctor can continue to hold their licence to practise.

 

From:  http://www.gmc-uk.org/doctors/revalidation/9612.asp & http://www.gmc-uk.org/Revalidation___FAQs_for_retired_doctors___DC5683.pdf_56109819.pdf

 

For further information and support, please visit: http://medicalapprais.wpengine.com

 

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